Three Days In Kanchanaburi


I’ve wanted to share this post with you all for a while. Over a month to be exact. But looks of fun new opportunities come up and spontaneous trips to Scotland happend so this got pushed to the bottom of the pile.

But now I can share with you some more Southeast Asia content and this time I’m writing about Kanchanaburi. It was one of the places in Thailand that we had on our list from the start. A few years back on my first trip to Thailand my family visited the area, whilst I jetted off to Cambodia for a bit. Their experience was great, so for this trip I made sure we visited.

How we got there

We flew from Chiang Mai into Don Mueang airport in Bangkok. Our plan was to grab a taxi to the train station and then hop on the next train to Kanchanaburi. It was hot, we were tired and it was Thai New Year. So for ease of our journey and to avoid the traffic and getting sprayed with water pistols whilst carrying our luggage, we paid for a driver to take us there. The journey took about and cost £70 for the two of us. Super expensive and even thinking about it now I wish we’d saved some money and relied on public transport.

Where we stayed

Whilst in Kanchanaburi we stayed at a place called Tara Raft. And to be honest it was a little hit and miss. The positive was this view. We were staying on a raft on the River Kwai so we got to wake up to some amazing views, plus we got see the beautiful sunsets from the hotels deck.

And that’s about where the positive ends. The faulty air con teamed with thick cotton bedding made the 38 degree heat we were dealing with so much harder to bare. I got seasick one night as the raft was swaying so much. And the bathroom smelt and looked pretty bad. But it was cheap and it served its purpose for the three days we were there so we stuck it out for the duration.

River Kwai Bridge

One of the first and actually our favourite thing to see in Kanchanaburi was the River Kwai Bridge. We walked all along the main strip to the bridge and were lucky enough to see a train go over the river.
For those of you who don’t know the railway was built during World War Two by the Japanese. And due to the high numbers prisoners that died in the year it took to build the 250 mile track, it’s nicknames the Death Railway. If you want to pay your respects to those that died you can visit the nearby Kanchanaburi War Cemetery.

Kanchanaburi Night Market

We also spend one evening at the Kanchanaburi night market, which was located a short walk from where we were staying. The market was surprisingly big, and had stalls selling vintage clothes, shoes, so much Thai food and craft items too. Although we didn’t find any food (it wasn’t super veggie friendly) and I only bought one item it was a good night. The market, unlike some in Thailand is catered for the locals. Many were going about their evening grabbing things for the evening meal, groups of girls were shopping for clothes and young couples were grabbing a bite to eat.

Erawan Waterfalls

My dad had suggested these Waterfalls to us as he’d been here on a previous trip to Thailand and absolutely loved them. As it was Thai New Year the car journey, which should have took us one hour, took three instead.

But once we were they we dived head first (not literally) into exploring the seven levels that Erawan had to offer. The first few levels were full of picnicking families so we opted to swim and paddle in the higher ones.

When we finally made it to the top level the noticed that the water was a surprising shade of pale milky blue. It was so beautiful and only slightly went down in my estimations once I’d seen how loathe the fish swimming about were. Seriously they were huge! The falls were a great day out when in Kanchanaburi, we would just recommend visiting at a quieter time of the year though.

And there you have it that’s how we spent three days in Thailand’s Kanchanaburi. It may not seem like we did a lot, but we took our time and just spent our days relaxing and taking it all in. It was Songkran after all!

Until next time.

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