Travel

English Heritage Virtual Tours

Eltham Palace leaflet held up in front of Eltham Palace on a sunny day

I’ve been an English Heritage member for the best part of six months now, and it’s one of my favourite memberships. We display our car sticker with pride and love spending weekends exploring the sites near us. But during this time you don’t have to give up on visiting your favourite English Heritage sites. There are plenty of virtual ways to discover new English Heritage properties or to revisit some of the best. So here are just a few English Heritage virtual tours you should definitely be experiencing right now.

Can you visit any English Heritage sites currently?

Yes and no. Currently, all staffed historic sites remain closed until further notice. This includes cancelling any events during this time too. You check out their full statement here. But it’s not all bad news for English Heritage members or visitors. Many of their sites that are free to enter are still open. So if you live close by to any of these sites, you can still visit during your exercise time. Just be sure to keep away from crowds and maintain social distancing too. If you want to check to see if there are any free to enter English Heritage sites near you, head to the Places to Visit section of their website. Once there be sure to filter by Free to enter and the properties will appear. Do check the information on each given property site as there may be closures or alternative opening hours.

English Heritage Virtual Tours

Image Credit: Screenshot from English Heritage Website

English Heritage, like many other national parks, museums and galleries, is sharing ways to explore the world without leaving the house. And luckily enough they have a range of virtual tours and 360° videos on their site for you to enjoy. Visitors to the website can access the Stonehenge virtual tour and Skyscape for free. But others are only available in the member’s area. Here are the virtual tours you can take part in:

  • Stonehenge- Get up close to the mysterious site of Stonehenge in their virtual tour. See the stones from a different perspective and learn more about this site.
  • Skyscape- Also set in Stonehenge is Skyscape. Set inside the stones, visitors can enjoy live views from the site, including views of the landscape and night sky.
  • Dover Castle- This medieval castle has always been high on my to-visit list and it’s great to learn more about its history.
  • Hadrian’s Wall- I’ve always wanted to visit Hadrian’s Wall and now I can! Explore Chesters Roman Fort and the Housesteads Roman Fort in the English Heritage 360° video.
  • Framlingham Castle- It’s one of the best-preserved medieval castles and the video of the site gives a unique perspective on almost 1000 years of history.

English Heritage and Google Arts and Culture

Image Credit: Screenshot from Google Arts and Culture English Heritage

English Heritage partnered with Google Arts and Culture for a super exciting project to bring you insider knowledge, interviews with the team and exciting virtual tours of other English Heritage sites. There really is a tonne of information provided for this project and you can spend hours exploring the different properties and time periods of England. If you’re not sure where to start here are some of my favourites:

  • Eltham Palace, London- This is a site that I’ve visited in person a few times. And if you love Tudor History, beautiful grounds and quirky decor Eltham Palace is a site that you must explore.
  • Battle Abbey, Sussex- Remember learning about the Battle of Hastings at school? Give yourself a refresh of the history of this battle whilst also virtually exploring the grounds of Battle Abbey.
  • Tintagel Castle, North Cornwall- If you’re missing the smells and sounds of fresh sea air a visit to the Tintagel Castle (virtually of course) may just make up for it.

English Heritage Podcast

If you’re a big podcast fan like me, you may be interested to know that English Heritage also has its own podcast. Each week you discover more about the properties under their care, hear from those who work with English Heritage and learn something new during each episode. You can listen online here or head to wherever you get your podcasts and download. Plus don’t forget to subscribe too.

There are just so many ways you can continue to support English Heritage at the moment. Be it through listening to their podcast, signing up to become a member or taking a virtual tour of their sites. I’d love to know what your favourite English Heritage site is. Let me know in the comments below!

Until next time.

NB. My English Heritage membership was purchased by me and was not gifted to me for this post. All links in this post are affiliate links, so if you choose to become an English Heritage member you will not be charged any more, yet I will make a small commission from it. Please, note all views are my own.

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